Skip to main content

tv   Talking Business  BBC News  January 28, 2017 8:30pm-9:01pm GMT

8:30 pm
roles with also great work on screen roles with also great work on the london stage. she replete quentin crisp. he made a return to that rule and then there were these fish, youthful audiences. —— fresh. even for doctor who fans, the most demanding audience of all, arguably, they didn't complain when he turned up they didn't complain when he turned up in the 50th anniversary episode. he has a singular appeal. what is your favourite? i fear that you would ask me that. they have been so many. i would have this in my personal favourite was when he played bob champion in the early 19805. played bob champion in the early 1980s. somehow, he managed to touch the humanity and the epic nature of that real—life role. that is my particular favourite. i realise that everybody has their own. many thanks. let's ta ke
8:31 pm
let's take a look at the weather. good evening. a little bit of snow across the hills of wales, and some icy patches tonight as well. that mix of weather continues into tomorrow. some of us will have sunshine, of us will have rain. in the short—term it is very hit and miss and it is unclear whether around as well but it is the northern half of the uk with the temperatures will dip away a bit tonight, perhaps one or two degrees above freezing in towns. the forsyth staying frost free for sure, so no ice for the south —— the far south staying. if you live in the north—east, newcastle and the lowla nds north—east, newcastle and the lowlands of scotland, and northwards, it should be a sunny
8:32 pm
crisp day for you. down south, it should be grisly and unpleasant and that will continue into sunday and even monday to be honest is looking pretty great as well across most of the uk. the week ahead will be a mishmash of weather. from sunny too rainy or the other way around. that is it for now. hello, this is bbc news with me, reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 8:30pm: chanting: no hate, no fear - muslims are welcome here! president trump's decision to order a temporary ban on all refugees
8:33 pm
entering the united states has been met by strong opposition from a number of nations, including iran. human rights groups have begun legal action to challenge the executive order. meanwhile demonstrations are taking place atjfk airport in new york, where some travellers have been detained. the prime minister has signed a deal to develop turkish fighterjets, which is worth more than £100 million. well, the united states is responsible for the united states' policy on refugees and the united kingdom responsible for the united kingdom's policy on refugees. stars from around the world have been paying tribute to the actor sirjohn hurt, who has died at the age of 77. star of stage, tv and small screen, he was best known for roles in the elephant man, alien and harry potter. now on bbc news it's time
8:34 pm
for talking business. rapidly growing economies — among them india — face a problem. millions of people are joining the workforce every year, but with financial pressures and automation there just aren't enough jobs to go around. so what can be done to generate more employment? that's what we're discussing on this week's talking business. welcome to the programme. i'm yogita limaye in bangalore. india is the fastest—growing major economy in the world, yet it's among the slowest in creating jobs. this country is growing at a rate of 7.6%. the growth in the number ofjobs being created is just a fraction of that at i.4%, and the rate at which people are coming onto the employment market is almost double that number. it is estimated india will need io millionjobs every year in order to employ a growing pool of young people without career prospects. and advances in technology and automation could mean more bad news. the technology is definitely
8:35 pm
going to disrupt the jobs market in the future. we would have to work every day to make it happen. we have seen this massive movement, and when we worked with a lot of the companies we have been able to reduce 2000 people, 3000 people, all in their back end, and completely replace them with artificial intelligence solutions. welcome, nice to meet you. one is an artificial intelligence experience within the store. from the minute someone walks into a store, rather than having a typical person greet him, explain the product of them, sign him up, things like that, it will all be done by an artificial intelligence screen. you can ask me anything. i want to open a fixed deposit. we've built a chatbot which can communicate with customers, so whenever you log a ticket or a query with the website saying that my cheque—book has not yet come in, now instead of a person being at the other end who will understand your query then figure out what to do,
8:36 pm
it is an artificial intelligence engine. that whole replacement is going to really change the way people are hiring now and the numbers there are hiring. you may see by 2020, i think, 100% automation on the low—level processes. things like opening an account, signing up for insurance, all these things which required human checks and validations can sort of be automated already. so how bad is the situation actually on the ground when it comes to creating jobs? well, to discuss that we've brought together a panel of guests — manish sabharwal, chairman of recruitment firm teamlease, kiran mazumdar—shaw, chairperson of biopharmaceutical company biocon, and mr dilpreet singh, who is the vice president of human resources at ibm india and south asia. thanks very much for being here with us today. i am going to start with you. so how bad is the
8:37 pm
situation actually? well, i think actually, you know, there is a huge challenge the world over. i thinkjobs growth is something that every economy is facing, and india is not alone. india of course has seen that it has been a pretty tough uphill task in terms of creating newjobs. in the last two decades we have seen 300 million people come into thejob market, and less than half of them, maybe 140 million, have been employed. and i think this number is steadily declining, so it is... and the population is increasing, so you can see that it is a big challenge. mr singh, your sector — it — and if you look more broadly, services, has been a big employment generator in india. in the past four or five years, do you think that situation has changed? is it creating fewerjobs? the jobs have been changing. it has definitely been creating less jobs in 2015 compared to what it was error there, so overall i think ——
8:38 pm
what it was earlier. overall it is about the number of jobs what it was earlier. overall it is about the number ofjobs created for the gdp, the rate ofjob growth, and for india that has been declining. also i think in the last decade we have had lower growth than compared to the global average so, yes, we do have a problem. i think you have to be careful with technology. when you asked this question, you said, it has created a lot ofjobs. but there is rounding error in india's river fosse. it pays high salaries and we are proud of them for that but we do not really give a dam about them from a labour market perspective —— in india's gdp. 3 million is a rounding error... what is creating jobs in india? services. india's farm to non—farm transitions is happening to sales, customer services, logistics, the fastest—growing segment of india's
8:39 pm
market. india is consumption driven —— domestic driven economy. we do not have the same global manufacturing opportunity china had in 1978. i do not think that is a good thing. i wish we had the same openness to trade and global chances china had for 30 years. india does not have that, so our trajectory of oui’ not have that, so our trajectory of ourjob market may be more domestic consumption than export and manufacturing. so you do not agree that, you know, there are statistics which show our unemployment rate is going quite slowly compared to the country in general? remark i disagree with that. you have added 200 million people to the labour force in the last 20 years and they have been absorbed somewhere. the jobs problem is notjobs. it is formaljobs, good jobs. i think jobs problem is notjobs. it is formaljobs, good jobs. ithink he makes a point. if you would get the job market, yes, 50% is
8:40 pm
self—employed and 30% is casual and 20% is formal employment. so i think he makes a point of saying that the biggest problem we have is in this 50 and 30% category where people probably earn less than 10,000 rupees a month, you know. and i think we have a big need to keep jobs —— take jobs away from the farm and really take it out of the farm and really take it out of the farm and into the services sector, into the sales sector, as he calls it. so ido the sales sector, as he calls it. so i do agree in that respect with him that, yes, perhaps india's challenge and india'sjob that, yes, perhaps india's challenge and india's job challenge that, yes, perhaps india's challenge and india'sjob challenge is slightly different to what you would actually discussed in other parts of the world especially in developed economies. i will slightly diverse year but everywhere i read the country when i travel, every business owner i meet, we speak about there being not enough employment generated —— everywhere around the country. but he says he is struggling to find labour, that there is this huge employability problem. is there something you see?
8:41 pm
90,000 kids come to us for a job every month and we hire about 5000 of them —— every month and we hire about 5000 of them -- 90,000 kids. but it is a more complicated problem. it is also the lack of organisation. the jobs are being created in 50 cities but we have 600,000 villagers, and 200,000 of them have less than 200 people. so the physical geography of work... do you take jobs to people or people to jobs? work... do you take jobs to people or people tojobs? it is also becoming a constraint for india. you read one of the leading bio pharmaceutical firms in the world. —— lead one off. how difficult is it for you to find people to give jobs to? that is the challenge in most industries because we want to scale up, attain global scale, and to do that you need those high—end skills in large numbers otherwise you just find it is a very small talent pool
8:42 pm
being tapped into by everybody, and therefore you're not really able to scale of the sector. whilst individual companies can scale up, the sector does not, and you need to scale up that sector. so i think from that point of view you really need to focus on developing this large talent pool required to support such a large sector, and thatis support such a large sector, and that is what i think india needs to do. and, you know, talking about that, only 20% formal employment in oui’ that, only 20% formal employment in our country. what do you think needs to change for that to change, for that number to grow? for us to unleash the growth ofjobs i think each of the various arms of the government body, or the biggest parts of the government body, have to really work in sync, because to me that is extremely important. because if that is not there, you know, it will not happen. to give an example, if you were to have highly skilled people available, and you
8:43 pm
we re skilled people available, and you were able to do that, but if our banking is not supporting entrepreneurs to come into play, and evenif entrepreneurs to come into play, and even if the banking is supportive but the labour lows are very restrictive, right, then it will not happen, sol restrictive, right, then it will not happen, so i think it is a systems approach required if we really want to take up and grow the jobs here. formalisation isjust... it is not cultural. india is a hot habitat for intracoronary rail ownership and we have 63 million enterprises, and 12 million of them do not have an office, 12 million work from home. only 8.5 million enterprises have any tax registration. only1 million are companies, but there are only 18,000 companies in india with a paid—up capital of more than $1.5 million. $0 paid—up capital of more than $1.5 million. so that means nothing. but there is nothing cultural about this. i resent it when people go on
8:44 pm
about indian informality. at best, thatis about indian informality. at best, that is the soft bigotry of low expectations and at worst it is racism. there is nothing informal about it. if you fix the regulatory cholesterol formality could go from 20% to 80% of the labour force, which is what they were attempting to do, but there will be lots of other initiatives over the next hopefully 2—3 years. other initiatives over the next hopefully 2-3 years. what specifically do you want to see change? if we can deregulate and actually free up these new emerging industrial opportunities like e—commerce, i think you can create a large number of jobs. companies e—commerce, i think you can create a large number ofjobs. companies like uber, between them, they have created a million driverjobs, no mean feat. although they are having a tough time with every state government wanting to rain them in. and the same is true of various e—commerce companies were again the
8:45 pm
kind of regulations are stifling them. overall, what are we seeing? entrepreneur, the investor, orthe organisation should have the flexibility of being able to take the risk of starting the organisation —— what we saying? and if it is not going well they should be able to let somebody go to harry later, or for example the flexibility of the labour lows will encourage organisations to adopt automation, more productive —— to hire them later. and that is more productive because it generates cash and when you have that you can reinvest into different areas to create more jobs. mr xxx, thank you for being with us. important to have a view from the it sector, which india is known for globally —— mr singh. in the second part we will be discussing, what are the jobs of the future? but first, here is our comedy consultant with his thoughts on this week's talking point.
8:46 pm
comedy consultant with his thoughts on this week's talking pointlj comedy consultant with his thoughts on this week's talking point. i am here at dublin city university's innovation lab, in an empty office $0011 innovation lab, in an empty office soon to be occupied by innovative companies, and i am thinking about jobs of the future. predicting the future is a mug's game. in fact we do not even know if there will be mugs, as they will probably be disrupted by some new receptacle. in the future, whatever happens, billions of people will arrive on planet earth and they will need something to do to occupy their time. the question is what are the futurejobs? time. the question is what are the future jobs? there is time. the question is what are the futurejobs? there is nothing like being ina futurejobs? there is nothing like being in a big empty office to concentrate the mind on whatjobs might be like in the future. this is like a blank sheet of paper. the possibilities are endless. the challenge of an empty office is how to fill it with jobs, and what are those jobs to fill it with jobs, and what are thosejobs going to be? right,
8:47 pm
that's enough speculation from me. let's top to the people who are thinking properly about future jobs. —— let's talk. the people training the next generation. this is what they call the fourth technological revolution, a combination of different technologies such as ict, microelectronics, nano electronics, all coming together in a convergent way to provide new products and services, and there are skilled needs and requirements there for people having these new combinations of skill sets. thinking about the future, it is also important to keep an ion the past. the miners, farmers and weavers of previous centuries have gradually been replaced by the marketing technicians, the product evangelists, and the strategic enablers of the present. but the
8:48 pm
march of time is inevitable, and change will continue. when you speak about newjobs, change will continue. when you speak about new jobs, a change will continue. when you speak about newjobs, a lot of newjobs are actually evolutions of existing jobs or professions. the salesperson's roll and job is definitely evolving. maybe we think it will be ten years from now, but many companies will struggle to just sell a product. i many companies will struggle to just sella product. ithink many companies will struggle to just sell a product. i think the many companies will struggle to just sell a product. ithink the product isjust a feature sell a product. ithink the product is just a feature that delivers a benefit, and you need to be able to share in the cost of the features and also share in the upside of the benefits. we see our salespeople now as originators of deal flows and allocators of our firm's capital, and that is a vastly different way of looking at a sales position than you will get at, say, a traditional lighting firm. so on reflection it seems there is no time like the present to prepare for the jobs of the future... you can watch more of his films at bbc.com/talkingbusines.
8:49 pm
we will continue our discussion here. we are also joined by the co—founder of an online grocery delivery service. thank you very much for being with us. i will start with you. almost 70% ofjobs in india are said to be at risk because of changes in technology. is that something you agree with, something you are seeing something you agree with, something you are seeing on something you agree with, something you are seeing on the ground? actually i have a very myopic view because our problems are usually the other way round. we think we are creating a lot ofjobs but we are not finding the right kind of people for those jobs and for us that happens at both levels, the tech level where we are trying to hire good engineers, but also on the supply level. they are helping us think a lot of people that are doing the jobs in our warehouses, for delivery, and i think a lot of the
8:50 pm
discussion happening is still releva nt discussion happening is still relevant to us where i think we are not finding the right people for the rightjobs. but not finding the right people for the right jobs. but i not finding the right people for the rightjobs. but i also think, moving forward , rightjobs. but i also think, moving forward, we will not see that much job contraction because of automation. i think we will see a lot more jobs created before we start losing them. with automation. technology always poses the perceived threat of displacing jobs 01’ perceived threat of displacing jobs or shedding jobs, and actually history has shown that technology does not do that. actually technology creates new kinds of jobs, so, you know, ithinki technology creates new kinds of jobs, so, you know, ithink i agree with what albinder is saying. i think it is basically about displacing certain types ofjobs but creating new ones. i think that is what we should look at, so i think india has a very different kind of opportunity in terms of technology and how it is going to create a larger number of jobs than and how it is going to create a larger number ofjobs than what you think will happen with automation and new technologies. which will
8:51 pm
possibly shed and reduce jobs and new technologies. which will possibly shed and reducejobs in other parts of the world which have highly developed logistics and supply chains, unlike india, so i think here you will see a different kind of effect. you know, you started a start up here in india. do you think that is creating that sector... that sector is creating a lot ofjobs? four years ago we were nonexistent and now we employ 2000 people. i think that isjob creation but if you look at the life cycle of a company, the start—ups also die in this country because of different factors. three and a half years ago we went to a bank, we were profitable small company and asked for alone to buy a cargo hold and we we re for alone to buy a cargo hold and we were denied because they said the company needs to be two years or older and that was one of those points where we thought, how do we scale up from there? i had to borrow
8:52 pm
the money from my dad to buy a second—hand car. so there is no support. i think there can be and huge employment generator. a lot of people in the start—up sector have already built companies, examples of that that have gone on to create thousands and thousands ofjobs, and i think we can have it but we need to make sure the smaller companies survive. there needs to be an environment for them to be nurtured and moved to the next stage where they can be significant employment generators. on the one hand we talk about the fact we are not generating enough employment but everywhere i have gone across the country, and i met business owners always complaining about the fact they cannot find enough workers. complaining about the fact they cannot find enough workerslj totally cannot find enough workers.” totally agree. a lot has to do with regulation. i think a lot also has to do with more social logical change. especially with the cities, where the early urbanisation is happening, we see a lot more formalisation of the economy happening in the bigger cities. but at the moment we need to set up warehouse in second—tier city, or
8:53 pm
people to work as package boys are delivery boys, big chunk of women workers with degrees who do not want to do anything outside the house... even a lot of educated men would prefer to sit at home and not do anything because they are not really dealing with the pressure of earning a wage everyday, so we don't end up finding a lot of workers there. a wage everyday, so we don't end up finding a lot of workers therem there any prediction you can make at all as to which indian jobs are safe... future proof? let's not try to predict where jobs will be, but let's try to make india self— healing. let's try to make india self—healing. reduce let's try to make india self— healing. reduce regulatory cholesterol and improve human capital. it is's came to predict where the jobs will be. make the job market and education system self— healing, because india's market and education system self—healing, because india's scale is something no country in the world has faced before. i still believe there are many technologyjobs that
8:54 pm
are future proof. i think software, for example, but it is a very small pa rt for example, but it is a very small part of thejob. for example, but it is a very small part of the job. if you want to look at future proofing, i think these are the kind ofjobs that will a lwa ys are the kind ofjobs that will always be in demand, but then having said that, you know, there are many other opportunities for a country like india, and what do you define as the future? for india i think we can sort of sustained job growth, probably for the next 20—25 years without a problem, but is that the future you are speaking about? you really cannot predict beyond that, because you really do not know what it is going to look like in terms of thejob it is going to look like in terms of the job market and job opportunities, but future proofing india for the next 20 years is extremely important, and i think this is where a lot of these jobs being spoken about will come from. and we need to basically strengthen that system to enable it. as someone who is part of that new sector coming up, the new online enables sector, if i may call it that, what,
8:55 pm
according to you, are the jobs of the future? do you see different jobs of the future? actually i think my view would be that the future proofed jobs are probably more in the food sector than in technology so the food sector than in technology so far. and that scale much bigger in food because we need to produce food for a lot of people and we see that as a sort of broken supply chain, ourfarms are that as a sort of broken supply chain, our farms are broken, that as a sort of broken supply chain, ourfarms are broken, the supply chain is broken, we waste a lot of that and have a lot of hungry people. so i thinkjobs in that sector will always be there. e—commerce, we will see how the next five years player, whether we are significant enough or not in the end. but clearly the three industries, education, health care, construction. and sales, customer service and logistics. if you divide it functionally that will be across many industries, and just given health care, education, construction, they will employ away smaller number in india today than
8:56 pm
they well. that is it from this edition of talking business in bangalore. dojoin edition of talking business in bangalore. do join us edition of talking business in bangalore. dojoin us again next week. —— they will in the future. time for a look at the weather. it is turning milder across the uk but it will be a slow process. northern parts of the country, not the mild. in fact it is snowing in some areas. the weather will be a bit of the next tomorrow. this is what we had today. quite a lot of cloud across scotland and it is still snowing and raining in eastern parts of scotland. this code will be across the country tomorrow. in the short term, a chance of some eyes across parts of scotland, northern ireland, northern england as well —— some ice. some of these showers are
8:57 pm
still heavy and wintry, and they have been pushing through wales. a bit of wintering is as well in northern parts of wales but in the south it is too mild. for any ice. this front is heading our way tomorrow. first turning cloudy then that the bricks of rain reaching the south west, wales and eventually northern ireland later on in the day. but this looks really soggy, doesn't it, on sunday afternoon? temperatures are not bad, 11 in plymouth. still relatively chilly. not a pretty picture for the midlands. just about into the north—west of england. northern ireland getting the rain as well. but newcastle and the lowlands, northwards, beautiful day... frosty start, lots of sunshine out there. stunning afternoon, then again another frosty night tomorrow night across scotland, but to the south it stays grey and rainy, with drizzle. how about the week ahead? pretty mixed, some sunshine but also some rain. and the other way round with
8:58 pm
the graphics. but a lot of greyness around. it really will not be pleasa nt around. it really will not be pleasant on monday, drizzle in places, that thick mist around and thatis places, that thick mist around and that is really the case across most parts of the country. feeling still chilly across the north—east of the uk. in the south we are well and truly into that milder air, 12 degrees on the south coast. then the southerly winds will push that further north on tuesday. but there will be also some heavy rain, at least for a time. short sharp bursts across the west. look at these double figures all the way up into scotland. 10 degrees for glasgow and edinburgh. wednesday, perhaps a bit of rain in the morning. and maybe in the afternoon, but for most of the uk in the afternoon wednesday is not looking bad at all. and next week on the way. some sunshine and rain, but the way. some sunshine and rain, but the main message is things are gradually turning milder. this is bbc world news today,
8:59 pm
broadcasting in the uk and around the world. i'm alpa patel. the headlines: let them in! protests at new york's kennedy airport and a legal challenge as donald trump signs an executive order barring migrants and refugees from several muslim countries. this is wrong and we're going to fight it, right here on the streets. were going to fight it the courts. travellers are prevented from boarding and some are detained after landing in america. iran calls it an "insult to the islamic world" and says it will do the same thing
9:00 pm
to americans. british prime minister theresa may signs a $125 million defence deal on a visit to ankara. tennis star serena williams breaks the record for the number of grand

67 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on